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Improve Your Emotional Intelligence

Some people just have that charm to them where they make you feel like you can sit comfortably and chat with them, knowing they’re listening, understanding and not judging you. You know, the kind of people you can talk to for a few minutes and immediately feel better; people with personal skills and great listening skills.

Other people have fantastic emotional skills; never screaming or getting angry, always calmly facing any problem that might come their way. Accepting of criticism, not budging to pressure, not letting cross words get to them.

What both these people have in common is a high degree of emotional intelligence; they understand themselves and their own emotions as well as the emotions, thoughts, behaviour and needs of others. Wouldn’t life be better if we could all be like this?

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Emotional Intelligence (EI) has gone from strength to strength in recent years and is now considered as important in both personal lives and professional lives as IQ, and no surprise. Whether it be a divorce lawyer, a psychiatrist for depression, counsellor or other mental health specialist who has to handle clients with great sensitivity, a real estate agent meeting prospective buyers, a member of the police force (who of course must handle situations delicately), or even a telephone salesman trying to make a trade, the better we are able to relate to others the better we are able to perform our jobs.

Social skills are incredibly valuable but can be difficult to develop, after all, there are so many different personalities how can we possibly understand and interact with them all effectively?

The answer is in developing our Emotional Intelligence, and if there’s one person who can help us develop our emotional intelligence it’s ME—oh wait, no, sorry, it’s not me, it’s Daniel Goleman, an internationally known psychologist who lectures frequently to professional groups, business audiences, and on college campuses.

Daneil Goleman describes Emotional Intelligence as having five key components: